People of Note

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King AlfredKing of Wessex (848/49 – 899)

Copy and paste this link into your browser to read his will, in which he bequeaths ‘Milbourn’ to his son Ethelward (p. 33):

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=dqENAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA33&lpg=PA33&dq=manors+owned+by+king+alfred&source=bl&ots=4NBqcsgZA4&sig=ACfU3U1rAPUnL4C9HA2c2YI1zHaxYXvIgQ&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiNz5br7Jv3AhUNa8AKHYS4BnEQ6AF6BAgTEAM#v=onepage&q=manors%20owned%20by%20king%20alfred&f=false

Did you know that King Alfred’s two elder brothers – Aethelbald (died 860) and Aethelberht (died 865)- are buried in Sherborne Abbey; it is likely that Alfred would have been present at their funerals or would have at least visited their resting places? It is also possible that a third brother was buried there too. For more information, follow this link: king-alfred.com/wp/2019/08/07/sherborne/

William Osmond – Unsung Hero
Milborne Port has its very own agricultural revolutionary in the form of William Osmond, a local shepherd, who in 1873 was victimised by his employer, a wealthy Milborne Wick farmer called Charles Bugg, and sent to prison with six months hard labour for organising agricultural labourers in the area (inspired by George Mitchell, Somerset leader of the National Agricultural Labourers Union). On his release in January 1874, over 2,000 local people marched through Milborne Port in his support. Click here to read more about our Unsung Hero.

Samuel Game – Clockmaker
The discovery of a grandfather clock belonging to Edward Hallett of Swatchford led to further research into local clockmakers with a view to discovering who made it.  One possibility was that local clockmaker Samuel Game who was born around 1702 in Milborne Port.